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gets away with this, this recovery is gone. scott brown, next. >> if that were the case, the minimum wage today would be $22 hour. with the minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, it's wt happened to the other $$4.75 #. neil: let's be clear here. s democratic senator suggests the minimum wage should be maxing out close to $22 an hour, all things being equal, of course, all things being equal, i would be michael phelps, but that's nots th case, is it? businesses already worrying about the president's push to hike it to nine bucks an hour. warren eking out the victory over my next guest, scott brown, whofound that race to be never, ever again, although they begged him to run. >> great to havyou. >> great to be on, neil, thank you. neil: what do you think of this? she's arguing phenomenon a substantial hike in the minimum wage when a lot of businesses and folkses, say, well, that could put us over the top. >> reviews are important, something that's been done throughout history, but you need to make sure businesses are at the table, number one. number two, to think it would go to $22 an hour, the
brown, and our own nicole petallides on whether they can and will. nicole kno of what she speaks. her parents are from cyprus and she has visited there many times or so. these are wholly times. >> i am so glad that you're painting it in the proper way. this is .2% of europe's gdp. it is a small island and it is being menial to so many. but it paints a picture of what is going on there. which is catastrophic. you go in there and you are talking about confiscating peles money. not letting them have access and availability to them. almost turning this over what really is a huge political battle around the world. the russians and germans and the eurozone and cyprus is caught in the middle. in the meantime from the people are not able to access their money. they don't have gas lines. they are not able to get gas. it is unbelievable the fact that they are living there. the fact that they are frightened and scared. they work so hard to put money in the bank. neil: your parents were born there. they are not there now. a lot of money find its attraction. now that is being questioned. so even w
stopped is black or brown. >> 80% of stop and frisk. >> more than that. something like 87%. not only that, even in the white neighborhoods, it is all minorities that are being stopped and frisked. there's no denying that this racial profiling going on here. and add to the pact that almost everybody who is being stopped, almost 700,000 in one year alone, almost everybody being stopped, has done absolutely nothing wrong. this is -- you know, this is not america. this is not democratic. >> confirmation after lot of this that we have been saying. this is perhaps a useful policing tool that's been misused and abused. that's occurred for years. so when you start to stop people based on purely what they look like and who they are, as you said, more than 9 on% of the people are black and hispanic. >> i think it is useful to be improve pd we need intensive training of a police officer of what the appropriate constitutional methodology is of stop and frisk. assign them to patrols and interact with the community. they will trust. thirdly, i think we need to regulate, tax and legalize marijuana so th
mild reforms like you are not allowed to accept gifts and things like that. governor jerry brown wants to do more. the whole structure of the board is basically dysfunctional and he wants to add more board members with specific financial expertise to this because half of the board members are elected but essentially public emplooees in california and don't have any qualifications for being on the board. they have to make changes legislatively taken care of. gerri: the people getting hurt here, does not necessarily the pension, it is taxpayers. what is the price tag of this? >> here is the thing, a recent report put calpers in the bottom 5% in the country among investment rurns several years. this is not right. thisis is a state that has enormous unfunded pension liabilities and projected 7.5% annual returns every year, they are going to be one of the worst performers. so there is a history reallyof mismanagement that really needs to be changed, they need professional management. gerri: the problem is how do you tear apart, how do you break away elected officials and the unions themselv
it hasn't been done unanimously. if you'd done this with brown versus the board of education, you'd still have segregated schools in alabama. you can't put that on a ballot. these judges need to decide whether it's a constitutional right, not state by state. >> do you think this is a constitutional right? do you think it's a 14th amendment issue, or do you think this is about an individual? is this an issue about individual rights and expanding them under the constitution, or is this an important social and cultural issue which is evolving, which is changing? >> marriage itself -- it's a little bit of both, and i'll tell you why. marriage itself has always been in the province of the states. in all kinds of relationships like that -- marriage, divorce, child custody, for example -- and usually under the states' police powers, by and large. there's a reason why this worked. when this debate started, when prop 8 was put on the ballot in california, the gay marriage rights lobby was losing, the traditional marriage lobby were losing state after state in many of the constitutions by the simpl
joins us later. campbell brown will be here and "the washington post" ezra klein. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >>> no good news and another snowstorm moving across the country. most likely sunday into monday. let me show you the stark contrast between this start of spring and last year. last year at this point the blue on the map and the purple show you where the snow was. no snow pretty much east of the ms river and through the midwest. only 20% of the country this time last year was covered in know. look at the map currently. 30% of the lower 48 covered by snow and we have snow pack from maine tlhrough the great lakes and upstate and wisconsin and minnesota. the winds coming down from canada over the snow, it just doesn't have a chance to moderate and warm up. look how cold it was yesterday. high temperatures in the 20s in the great lakes. we should be almost near mid-40s to near 50 this time of the year. this morning is very cold once again from fargo to minneapolis, chicago, just another bitterly cold day ou
time california has done this, governor. governorschwarzenegger and governor brown have signed into law the retro tax hikes, i'm surprised you can find a business owner left in california, they are leaving because of this onerous tax burden. it is one thing to head into your fiscal year planning knowing what your tax levy will be. it is another thing going into without knowing what they are going on to add-on. neil: that is a billion -- brilliant point. you are just going to break that promise. >> you know, we have a super majority here in california of liberal democrats, we have a pour hungry bureaucrat, all wanting more money, as a business owner we don't know how to operate. we have the cloud over our head, we don't know when the tax liabilitiy will be. in tax we could at left anticipate it. now we worry, is there a surprise. this is unethical and immoral and wrong way to try to create jobs and a business that is going to grow, that is why 5.5 companies every week leave california. >> thank you very much. we'll see, dangerous precedence. neil: democrats playing the baby card? saying
. this is the brown and -- [inaudible] you're watching barrels, oak barrels being charred. they will be filled with bourbon soon. you got to make it that way. >> yes, you do. bourbonhas to go in a new white oak charred barrel. >> one of the republicans the stock is doing well is they are the only bourbon maker essentially that makes your own barrels. we work with the masters to customize needs to the service. >> that's the chars you can get. that's a heavy char. that one's medium, and this, obviously, the lighter ones. it means different tastes to the bourbon. >> heavier char allows us to get color into the bourbon at a quicker taste so you get more sugar in the wood. >> this is how they assemble the barrels and sell them on the open market as well. look at how they fit together. hoops go on them there, and this gives you a tremendous advantage over your competitors because you can control exactly how that char takes place. >> right. >> we control the whole supply from the wood cut to the barrels being made that gives us the tremendous advantage to know what we need and way we're looking for i
and not dark people or brown people from the south. how can you say you're basically for racialization of america, that whites should be welcome, but not other people. >> it's a mystery -- sorry. go ahead. >> i think what's the story is the evolution of cpac. it's so much the evolution of the republican party. it used to be a conference that attracted very, very conservative figures. now more and more you've seeing mainstream people i think that's very scary for republican parties, especially members and consultants who want to win again down the line. >>> here's sarah palin talking about something a bit you might say off-color, but it's her way of being funny and a bit of a redneck. >> you should have seen what todd got me. it wasn't that exciting, a metal rack, case for hunting rifle to put on the back of a four-wheeler, and then i had to get something for him to put in the gun case, right? so this go-around he's got the rifle. i got the rack. >> so that's how it's done, ron. liberals can't talk like that. conservativ conservatives, people on the wacko right can talk like that. i gue
was thrown into sharp relief as brian brown, president of the national organization for marriage found himself voicing opposition to gay marriage in front of an empty room. memo to republicans and actually anyone on planet earth -- if you find yourself making an argument to a room full of empty chairs, it might be time to change your strategy. james, i want to go you first on this, given your storied past. a column in the "washington post" yesterday said clinton's announ announcements moves the ball significantly in confirming that no democratic presidential candidate will ever be viable, she's sending a strong member to the court is that americans are ready to embrace it. >> i think it's not unexpected. to say the least. and i do think it does send a signal, no one is going to run for the democratic nomination that doesn't embrace marriage equality. i would just point out that republicans do have some experience talking to empty chairs. so -- >> that is bad i totally missed the joke. >> all the republicans that signed the supreme court brief, do a little exercise and see how many of t
that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be like in 100 years. i don't get that. what do you think? >> when we think about what the typical american is, this is shown throughout social science literature. the typical american type is a white male, protestant, straight, married. right? so when we think about any departure from this type is considered the oth
achievement. you get brown v board but you don't necessarily get desegregated schools. >> quite the opposite. >> right. the focus on the legal right, while totally understandable because equal rights under the law seems like a basic starting point for any kind of egalitarian politics. it's a piece. one of the things -- i think that the analogy made to abortion is quite instructive. the energy with ruth bader ginsburg this morning. one of the problems with the way abortion has evolved as an issue was that it was disarticulated from broader reproductive justice issues. so that abortion sort of became like a consumer right that an individual could purchase approximate she could afford it. >> yep. >> other people would lose the right because it wasn't understood as a matter of justice. it was understood as a kind of consumer right. with marriage, the same danger is there. that the legal right to access to marriage as it now exists is kind of the end point. even though we won't get there now, we'll get there eventually. rather than understanding that a broader way of recognizing household and par
constitutionally has to have some reason to be able to do this. and stopping folks because they're black and brown does not pass constitutional muster at all. talk to me about what that be constantly frisked is disheartening. these people are living every day lives and are stopped. the law enforcement who works for the city. it's absurd. and i shouldn't have to worry what a cop is thinking or wonder just because i'm walking outside at night that i'm more likely to be stopped. that shouldn't exist. >> this idea, councilman is part of -- i feel like it's the difference of the experience of being a black american. when you see the police car, you get a sense of anxiety, and not a sense of protect and serve. >> i parentally it doesn't stop. i was arrested trying to get into event. the officer either didn't believe who we were or didn't care. it's also frustrating to me that it seems like things in the 1960s. we're trying to tell people why it's wrong to do things in the community. it's amazing we need this discussion. when it comes to larm and stopping crime, the answer has always been stop as many as
what it means. literally no one knows what it means. you call people up, back brown checks that makes common sense. they put down their phone and go about their day and do they ever think about it again? maybe, maybe not. do they call their congressman, write a check, show up at a town hall. when we talk about where the public is, you know, it's this incredibly mysterious thing that ends up occupying the center of every conversation we have. >> it doesn't measure depth. >> i totally agree on the gun issue. >> with guns there's a majority in favor of -- >> background checks. >> background checks. but it's whether you can mobilize that majority and actually really gun advocates are far more likely to write a letter, far more likely to lobby and far more militant. one of the differences between this and immigration reform immigration reform as a ready made mobilized community behind it. they are trying to actually create a community around guns. >> i want to read this quote because this is a politico report on a deal the white house made with groups that are advocating gun safety legisl
'm a ron brown democrat, and i remember when he told me, when the democrats are in the wilderness, it's never as good as you think and it's never at bad. the republican party can rally around and bring minorities and women to the table, but it's about actions and deeds. when you have people out there doing the type of things that, for example, the leader, mcconnell, was doing or some of the leadership in the house of representatives, it's not about words. those words, those 97 pages, that must have been the abridged version. it must be a much longer dissertation to understand really what their problems is. but at the end of the day, it's about actions and deeds. i believe my republican brother and i have a lot of great friends on the republican party. i believe they can turn it around. but it gets down to, craig, actions and deeds. when you show great actions and you do great deeds, people will rally around you. >> i thought you were about to say -- >> i want your friends too. >> i thought he was about to say, i have republicans over to my house all the time. >> they always come over
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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